Cobra Commander — Secrets!

The snake is a great metaphor...Phor gettin' bitches back to my crib!

Secrets…

My most evil world domination plan yet: Game of Thrones.

Secrets…

I'm responsible for 7 of the last 9 songs that only describe how to do a dance.

Secrets…

I've got 80% of the Republican candidates on my payroll. Ron Paul refuses to see the light, though.

Secrets…

People really don't understand the burden of leading a terrorist organization...And staying trim enough to fit into this jumpsuit.

SECRETS!!!

Game Tape

Not much to talk about this week. Batman and Robin was shorted this week, but I should have a copy by Saturday.

On a whim I picked up Loki #1. It’s not a bad book, but it’s a only an adequate book. It’ll probably read better as a collected trade. This series continues the idea that Loki is a function of the stories told about him. We see how Loki remembers acquiring Mjolnir for Thor. It’s well told and the art is decent, but this issue didn’t set my world on fire. Disappointing since I like the character of Loki. It is nice that with Balder’s death, Thor is sure we’re on the road to Ragnarok… too bad there’s no JSA to stop it.

Chaos War #2 didn’t inspire as much love this week as its predecessor. It’s still enjoyable and the story is headed in an agreeable direction. If nothing else, the scenes with the Silver Surfer are more than entertaining. Pay close attention to those sound effects. This issue is all about putting the band together in order to confront the Chaos King. Disappointingly, there is no back up feature here.

For those who miss $5 words and an over abundance of alliteration spewing from Cobra Commander’s mouth, G.I. Joe: Real American Hero #159 is the book for you this week. The Joes are making a break from Cobra’s Silent Castle. Plenty of BATs and things blowing up; plus there’s a ninja battle.

Not the best week of comics. I’m hopeful that B&R will make up for mediocre things.


Game Tape

The euphoria of Wednesday books has worn off; now it’s time to review the game tape and see what worked and what didn’t.

Jesse is apparently reading JL: Generation Lost. I don’t care for Winnick enough to even try it. Booster Gold #33 ties into this title directly, and it manages to make sense while not being bogged down as an integral part. Booster travels to the past to try to find some proof of Max Lord’s existence. Where else would Booster go except to Giffen and DeMattis’ favorite stomping grounds: the JLI era. Naturally, this is entertaining and smart. The ending is a little too pat though. If you’ve seen “Bedknobs and Broomsticks,” you’ll see it a mile away. Doom Patrol #11, by Giffen too, was out this week. My interest in this title has waxed and waned since Metal Men was pulled from it. It’s story telling with an eye toward trades. The idea that DP is on Oolong Island as a research/security force is really interesting. Unfortunately, along with this a reader must suffer through a shoehorned retread of Grant Morrison’s ideas. Dan the Street visited, as has Crazy Jane. Of course the team needs to fight weird challenges, but Morrison hasn’t cornered the market on strange. I’m probably dropping the book under the idea that there’s nothing new here.

SHIELD #2 came out this week. Johnathan Hickman’s long form “What if?” story continues to be interesting, and issue two comes in at a cheaper price of $2.99. Last issue worked to establish the world and the protagonist. This issue we get a clear idea of what the conflict will be. Leonardo Da Vinci shows up and all Hell begins to break loose. There’s an interesting appearance by Nostradamus also. If Doom Patrol is retread of old material, Hickman is providing readers with something different and unfamiliar while having hints of things we can recognize. Set in the 1950’s, we’ve got a prior generation of Stark and Richard. It will be interesting to see how or if he handles a certain (then) frozen captain. We’ve also got some interesting cosmic, almost Inhuman or Atlantean, ideas going too.

At HeroesCon this last weekend, one of the panels featured a conversation with Hickman and Jeff Parker. At one point they talked about their mutual love of letter columns and the insertion of text pieces in a story. Traditionally, text pieces supplement the main story. It is odd to see a text page replace what could have as easily been a traditional paneled page. It wasn’t a bad thing, just a strange and slightly jarring choice near the end of the issue. On the same panel, Hickman admitted that this story was meant to be a 12 issue maxi. Editorial mandates forced it to be cut in half. I hope this decision does not cause the story to suffer. Some of you may be waiting for the trade on this one, I can’t blame you. I would encourage you to give it a try in some form though.

I picked up Batman #700 this week, but I’ll wait for Jesse’s review. I know, despite his hemming and hawing over the price, that he’ll pick up this book. It’s Batman; he’s Jesse. It’s inevitable.

What surprisingly wasn’t on Jesse’s radar for this week is Eric Powell’s Buzzard #1. This mini promises to be an interesting a gruesome tale of one of The Goon’s more interesting and gruesome supporting characters. What’s especially appealing to me is that the story is essentially a western tale. A weird western tale to be sure, but it is a western tale none the less. There’s also a back-up feature for the short lived Billy the Kid’s Old Timey Oddities. This staunches the thirst during our Eric Powell drought.

In brief:

Amy Mebberson admitted that there’s a story reason Skeeter has not been called by name. It does not have anything to do with legal issues as some might guess. Langridge continues to tell nice done in one stories with an over arching story thread. Last week’s Muppet Show #6 brought back Wayne and Wanda and presented some truly weird and inspired bits. The frog scout mime-version of Death of a Salesman springs to mind first and foremost. This issue was made especially sweet by my custom hand drawn cover. I’ll include an image of this in a post this weekend of the arty things I picked up at the convention.

GI Joe: Cobra II continues to give us disturbing glimpses into the broad expanse of the world wide terrorist organization. This arc will focus on something we haven’t seen before: a Cobra controlled cult not unlike Scientology. There’s a mysterious Serpentor-like figure and a new take on the old  Joe, Scoop. No Chuckles this go round.

Secret Six wrapped up it’s rather disturbing look at Catman. His future with the team is called into question and…yikes. Just yikes. If you’re a fan of stone cold stone-coldness, here’s a book for you.